Handbagged, Chelmsford Theatre Workshop – The Old Court Theatre, Chelmsford.

Handbagged, Chelmsford Theatre Workshop – The Old Court Theatre, Chelmsford.

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I do remember Mrs Thatcher although I was too young to really grasp the political climate at the time but this playful and interesting speculation on what might have gone on behind closed doors during the 11 years that she was Prime Minister and her weekly meetings with Her Majesty was very enjoyable and at times quite moving too.
There are usually two Queens and two Thatcher’s on stage at any one time: these are older and young versions who occasionally disagree. It was reported that both Margaret and the Queen had a difficult relationship and the brilliant writing and portrayal of this piece surmises that perfectly.
Even the interval is a bone of contention: The Queen wants a break, but the PM is determined to press on.
Debbie Miles as the older Mrs T gave a solid performance showing great control in her delivery of the part and she was partnered by Andrea Dalton as the younger and more aggressive Margaret. In fact, Andrea had got the intonation and mannerisms of the part down so well it was hard sometimes to remember that you weren’t watching the actual Iron Lady herself.
As Her Majesty, Jane Smith gave a very convincing performance as the older Queen, her vocal imitation spot on and very believable as the slightly irritable monarch at times while Laura Hill as her younger self, had all the Royal composure you would expect and when both greet the commoners you did feel like you were in the presence of gloved royalty.
Casting Mark Preston, who seemed to morph into every character he undertook and Kevin Stemp, who reminded me of Tony Robinson, in all the smaller roles was inspired. Both played multiple parts as various people involved in the headlines of the day including Dennis Thatcher, both Ronald and Nancy Reagan (Mark Preston looking very fetching in a red dress and leopard skin heels), Gerry Adams, Arthur Scargill, Neil Kinnock, Michael Shea and Geoffrey Howe, as well as breaking down the fourth wall by chatting to the audience.
To complete the circle, the actors periodically get to comment on the way the show is being handled and the parts they are required to play.
Many of the major events of the period are touched on, including Zimbabwe independence, the Falklands War, the miners’ strike and the Brighton Grand Hotel bombing, but this is anything but a dry history lesson. We will never know what actually happened every Tuesday for 11 years in those meetings but tonight’s production gave us a glorious peak into what might have been.
Do try and see this if you can as it offers a great evening’s entertainment which won’t disappoint.
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